The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe at the West End’s Gillian Lynne Theatre

Strongly recalling visits to London’s National Theatre (another prominent example of 1970s brutalism architecture), it appears the Gillian Lynne Theatre in Covent Garden also mastered an auditorium without bad seats. For the price we paid, we are more than happy with our seats in the first row of the balcony to the right, despite the apparent restricted view: Even the … Continue reading The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe at the West End’s Gillian Lynne Theatre

Celebrating Ursula under the waves– Fat Rascal’s Unfortunate at the Underbelly Festival

In early Spring 2020 Fat Rascal’s podcast was the soundtrack to my first lockdown jigsaws, while theatre company founder Robyn Grant busied herself and the team with expanding Unfortunate’s story and the amount of songs to an evening filling production: The potty-mouthed retelling of Disney’s The Little Mermaid from sea witch Ursula’s perspective offers sheer … Continue reading Celebrating Ursula under the waves– Fat Rascal’s Unfortunate at the Underbelly Festival

Frozen at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane – a triumph

My non-fluent visitor from abroad has never heard of the most successful animated film ever and does not recognise pictures of the Pixar film, let alone the Oscar-recognized soundtrack. I had my suspicions already but still gasp when this is being confirmed over and over, even by someone who lives pop culture-wise under a stone … Continue reading Frozen at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane – a triumph

Planet of the Grapes – a cava-crowned celebration of lockdown crafting

Invited to forget about the ills of the world for an hour I celebrate one of the few GMT opportunities to join Peter Michael Marino’s live figure theatre take for all ages, streamed live from New York, on the 1968 cult classic film Planet of the Apes. I fell in love with staged science-fiction since … Continue reading Planet of the Grapes – a cava-crowned celebration of lockdown crafting

Watching Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol on cardboard – with Polka Theatre’s key audience as judges

Reviewing a recorded play of Charles Dickens’ uber-classic A Christmas Carol, aimed at 4-11-year-olds comes with a challenge when, however hard I try, I do not fit in the target audience. Luckily, I can rely on Eliana, six, and Nico, four, who happily help out, and with the assistance of their parents we all connect digitally and watch this 15 minute show from our screens miles apart together.  The video starts … Continue reading Watching Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol on cardboard – with Polka Theatre’s key audience as judges

Punkt Collective’s Penelope at the Lion and Unicorn Theatre in Kentish Town

Penelope is mainly known as the wife of the ancient Greek hero Odysseus, a king and warrior who first spent ten years in the Trojan war and then another ten struggling to find his way home to Ithaca – monsters aimed to destroy him and gods tried to prevent his return home, aiming to keep … Continue reading Punkt Collective’s Penelope at the Lion and Unicorn Theatre in Kentish Town

Hakuna Matata at the Lyceum Theatre – The Lion King is still stunning

It’s an amazing feeling to buy musical tickets for someone to see a show with when this very someone has taken you to the cinema years ago to watch the film this show is based on. The massive impact of The Lion King was even felt by my primary school self in late 1994 while … Continue reading Hakuna Matata at the Lyceum Theatre – The Lion King is still stunning

Heartwarmingly family-friendly: The Green Ship by Quentin Blake in London’s Librarian Theatre

Sir Quentin Blake is without doubt Britain’s most famous illustrator – even me growing up in Hamburg knew thanks to Roald Dahl’s BFG his drawing of Queen Elizabeth II before I knew Andy Warhol’s version. I have not come across Blake’s own children stories before though and therefore happily follow the invitation to the Librarian … Continue reading Heartwarmingly family-friendly: The Green Ship by Quentin Blake in London’s Librarian Theatre

Bioluminescence in Bologna: Cirque Du Soleil’s Toruk, based on James Cameron’s Avatar

Finally I am in the same city at the same time as Toruk, Cirque Du Soleil’s take on James Cameron’s Avatar. I wanted to see it since I first stumbled upon a call for puppeteers in the newsletter of the Jim Henson Association years ago. Now I am in Bologna, a lively city on a … Continue reading Bioluminescence in Bologna: Cirque Du Soleil’s Toruk, based on James Cameron’s Avatar